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What is the number after each item for sale on your page?
What is your shipping and return policy?
What are average healing times for new body piercings?
How do you measure sizes?
Do you have a physical retail store?
Why should I care for my new piercing?
Does it hurt to get a body piercing?
What type of navel piercing care should I perform?
What type of facial or ear piercing care should I perform?
What type of nipple piercing care should I perform?
What type of genital piercing care should I perform and how soon before I can resume sexual relations?
How should I care for my new piercing?
What medications, OTC, or herbal products could delay or interfere with my healing time?
What types of chronic disorders can effect my healing time?
What is your disclaimer?
What if I have heart disease?
Under what medical conditions should I not get a body piercing?
What about body jewelry and length during healing?
What about body jewelry and Xrays, CT scans, CAT scans, and MRI's?
What if I have a problem with placement?
What should I do if my piercing gets infected?
What if I get an allergy?
What if I need to remove or change my body jewelry?
Privacy-How private is my data?
Do you have a blog?


What is the number after each item for sale on your page?
This is in reference to an internal numeric system for where we store all items, & what they are. It is basically the same as a part number, and we can update our system based on the number of the item. It has no reference to how many are in stock or the price of the item.

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What is your shipping and return policy?
Please check out our policies in the "Terms" link located at the bottom of this page.

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What are average healing times for new body piercings?
Ear lobe: Between 4 - 8 Weeks Pinna/top/outer surface of earlobe: Between 2 to 4 Months Eyebrow: Between 2 - 4 Months Tongue: Between 2 - 3 Months Labret: Between 2 - 4 Months Male Nipple: Between 2 - 5 Months Female Nipple: Between 3 - 6 Months Lips: Between 2 - 4 Months Nostril: Between 2 - 4 Months Navel: Between 3 Months to 1 Year Genitalia, Male: 2 to 4 Months Genitalia, Female: 2 to 5 Months

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How do you measure sizes?
Please visit the following website for sizing: http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/00/00/11/50/19/18/1150191830._V195073780_.jpg

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Do you have a physical retail store?
Right now, our store presence is online only.

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Why should I care for my new piercing?
Proper body piercing care is crucial during and after the healing period. It is important to properly clean your body jewelry as well as the piercing itself, take steps to ensure a new piercing is protected from irritation, infection and potential injury, and to make informed choices about the type of body jewelry you wear.

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Does it hurt to get a body piercing?
Well, that depends on your pain/discomfort tolerance level. Every individual has a different tolerance level, and pain is highly individualized. What might be a tolerable level for you may be intolerable for someone else. Never get a body piercing under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

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What type of navel piercing care should I perform?
During healing, protect your navel piercing from being snagged on clothing, irritated from friction, or injured during physical sports and activities with this simple tip: Get a vented eye patch of hard plastic (found at most pharmacies), and secure it over your piercing using an elastic bandage like an ankle wrap.

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What type of facial or ear piercing care should I perform?
A facial or ear piercing requires a fresh, clean sleeping surface each night, and your piercing may bleed a little, so you don’t want to stain all your pillow cases. Here’s a simple solution: Get an old t-shirt you don’t want anymore and wash it well. Use it as a pillow case and you can get 4 clean uses out of it by rotating it each night – front, back, inside out front, inside out back. Clean anything that regularly touches the area of your piercing like your phone (especially cell phones), headphones, glasses, sun glasses and hats. If you use styling products for your hair, avoid getting them in your piercing. If you can, cover it with a band-aid while styling your hair.

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What type of nipple piercing care should I perform?
A tight, breathable cotton t-shirt or sports bra can make sleeping more comfortable. For sports or other activity that could cause injury to your piercing, consider the eye patch tip for navel piercings.

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What type of genital piercing care should I perform and how soon before I can resume sexual relations?
Sexual activity is usually okay as soon as you feel ready. Always use barriers such as condoms and dental dams to avoid contact with bodily fluids. Use barriers on sex toys as well to reduce the risk of infection. Decrease the risk of injury or irritation by soaking in warm saline solution beforehand. This will remove any crusted areas, and soften the piercing. Do not use saliva as a lubricant as it carries a lot of bacteria. Instead, use water based lubricant, preferably a new bottle. After sex, soak in saline solution again to avoid infection. Always wash your hands thoroughly before touching the piercing, and wear clean undergarments. If your piercing is near the urethra, and you’re cleaning your piercing with soap, urinate afterwards to get rid of excess soap in the area. Urinate before and after sexual activity to facilitate a decrease in microorganism growth. If you have a Prince Albert or Apadrayya piercing, do not be alarmed. They can bleed freely for the first few days of healing.

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How should I care for my new piercing?
How you care for your body piercing will of course depend on the type of piercing you have. The following are piercing care tips that will help you properly care for your specific piercing type, and make the right body jewelry choices. Healing times actually vary by individual. Do not remove your body jewelry during the healing process. If you are having an issue with the jewelry, for example if you find the material irritating, or the size too big, have it changed by a piercing professional (at least until it is properly healed). If you change your mind during healing and don’t want the piercing anymore, do not try to remove it yourself. Have it removed by a piercing professional. If your body jewelry has threaded ends (such as balls that screw on), check regularly to ensure they’re properly tightened. Remember to always wash hands well before touching your body piercing. Keep an extra (clean) ball with you in case you lose one. After healing, you should be able to change the body jewelry on your own quite easily, but remember to always keep jewelry in as even a well-healed piercing can start to shrink.

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What medications, OTC, or herbal products could delay or interfere with my healing time?
If you are taking medication to thin your blood, such as aspirin, Warfarin (Coumadin) or heparin, including low molecular weight heparins (Lovenox), or herbal products such as St. John's Wort, please consult with your health care provider before getting a new body piercing, as your healing time will be delayed.

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What types of chronic disorders can effect my healing time?
Persons with Diabetes Type 1 or 2 may experience delayed healing times. Persons with an immunocompromised state, such as HIV/AIDS, persons undergoing chemotherapy, or those with hemophilia should consult with their health care provider prior to getting a new piercing. The skin is the first line of defense to any infection, and when the skin is pierced (broken) the bodies immune system reacts. Immunocompromised individuals & those undergoing chemotherapy are more susceptible to infection, as the body's defenses are weakened. Persons with hemophilia may experience longer then normal bleeding times.

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What is your disclaimer?
These guidelines are based on a combination of vast professional experience, common sense, research, and extensive clinical practice. This is not to be considered a substitute for medical advice from a doctor. Be aware, however, that many doctors have no specific training or experience regarding piercing and may not be educated on how to best assist you. Please read our Terms page for more warnings.

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What if I have heart disease?
It is our suggestion that a piercer not pierce any client who has a pre-existing heart condition without a doctor’s consent and proof of a preventive antibiotic. These pre-existing heart conditions include but are not limited to: -Any client with an artificial (prosthetic) heart valve. -Any client with damaged (scarred) heart valves caused by a medical condition, i.e. rheumatic fever. -Any client with congenital heart defects or heart valve defects such as MVP (Mitral Valve Prolapse)- Heart Murmur, Valvular Stenosis, Valvular Regurgitation, or Atresion of one of the valves. Risks The major risk for those clients with heart conditions is Bacterial Endocarditis. This is a serious infection of the heart's inner lining (endocardium) or the heart valves. This can damage or even destroy your heart valves. Although rapid diagnosis, effective treatment, and prompt recognition of complications can lower the risk of mortality, prevention is still the best option. The American Heart Association (AHA) indicates that taking your prescription prophylactic antibiotics one hour before receiving a piercing or Etching will provide an effective prophylaxis against infection. *** The AHA also has a downloadable Bacterial Endocarditis Wallet Card available on their website at www.americanheart.org. Prevention is Key If you have to take antibiotics before seeing the dentist for a routine teeth cleaning, you need to see your doctor and ask him or her about taking antibiotics before receiving a body piercing. (Piercing is much more invasive than getting your teeth cleaned.) After you speak with your doctor, we suggest that you bring in a note from your doctor approving your piercing, as well as the filled prescription of antibiotics. We care about you and your health and wellbeing, and want every piercing to be safe and fun!

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Under what medical conditions should I not get a body piercing?
Sometimes it is inappropriate to perform even the most standard piercing. A piercer should politely refuse to perform a piercing that could be dangerous, ill suited, unsuccessful, or for which they are not trained. The following are examples for which a second opinion, in some cases from a piercing-friendly physician, may be needed before proceeding. An individual with heart valve disease (such as mitral valve prolapse) should consult their physician for prophylactic antibiotics. An individual has a heart murmur, diabetes, hemophilia, auto-immune disorder, or other medical condition(s) that may negatively influence the piercing procedure or the healing process. There is an obvious skin or tissue abnormality that may include but is not limited to rashes, lumps, bumps, scars, lesions, moles, freckles, and/or abrasions. The client wants to pierce irregular or surgically-altered anatomy, or the client is unsuited due to occupational, recreational, or environmental factors. The client is clearly under the influence of alcohol or drugs. The client has a history of seizures. Surface-to-surface, or other frequently unsuccessful (commonly rejected by the body) piercings. The client has impending plans to become pregnant and wishes to get a nipple, navel, genital, or other piercing. It is advisable to refrain from piercing during pregnancy to allow the body to focus on the important, complex, and demanding task that it is handling already.

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What about body jewelry and length during healing?
• Jewelry in a healing piercing should be of appropriate length or diameter. Too tight/small jewelry will not allow for air and blood circulation, some movement during cleaning, and for the expulsion of normal exudate from the wound. It may imbed, and can increase the possibility of swelling and other complications. • Jewelry in a healing piercing should be of an appropriate gauge (thickness). Too thin of a gauge, and the jewelry may be perceived by the body as a splinter, worked towards the surface and eventually ejected.

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What about body jewelry and Xrays, CT scans, CAT scans, and MRI's?
Your health care provider can determine if you will need to remove your body jewelry for these diagnostic tests. Normally, all metal is to be removed from the body for all of these tests, regardless of where your piercing is located. This is to decrease your risk of burns from metal associated with use of these machines.

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What if I have a problem with placement?
• Problem: Piercing is placed too shallow or the jewelry is too small (gauge/thickness) • Cause: Result of poor initial piercing placement. Inappropriate jewelry selection (length/diameter). • Result: Body will work the jewelry towards the surface and eventually be ejected. • Indications: Jewelry can be seen through the tissue. Jewelry encompasses less than 1/4-5/16” of tissue. Tissue is red and indurated across the entirety of the piercing and its placement very superficial. • Treatment: Removal of jewelry prior to ejection is preferable. If jewelry is removed the holes close up and scarring is minimized. If the jewelry is allowed to come through the surface by itself a split scar may remain. • Problem: Piercing is placed too deep or the jewelry is too small (length/diameter). • Cause: Result of poor initial piercing placement (most common) Delayed complication of swelling. Poor/inappropriate aftercare. Inappropriate jewelry selection (length/diameter). • Result: (includes but is not limited to): Prolonged healing time Impossible to heal. Unnecessary/unusual scarring. • Indicators: (with Ring) Ring is unable to lay flat comfortably. The tissue takes up more than 1/3 of the ring’s circumference. • Indicators: (with Barbell): Barpost can’t seen at either end of the piercing. Beads/Ends of the jewelry pinch or actually imbed in the tissue. • Treatment: Replacing of small jewelry for appropriately sized jewelry. Removal of jewelry to allow healing of too-deep piercing. Can be pierced again at a later date.

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What should I do if my piercing gets infected?
• Problem: Piercing has been contaminated by pathogenic microorganism(s). • Causes: Most Common: Piercee has touched piercing with dirty hands or otherwise contaminated piercing (exposure to bodily fluids, dirty water, etc.). Piercing done with inappropriately sterilized tools, needles, jewelry. Piercing done with unclean, ungloved, and/or contaminated gloved hands. • Indicators: Piercing exudes thick, green, malodorous pus. Piercing and surrounding area is warm/hot to the touch (more so than other skin). Piercing site is swollen, red, and painful. • Treatment: Consult with your health care provider! Increased mild sea salt soaks (for minor infections). Oral/topical antibiotics, as prescribed by a physician. Removal of jewelry in the presence of an infection may result in an abscess. In the event there is a localized, draining infection, quality jewelry should be left in place to allow for passage of matter to the surface, or as indicated by your health care provider.

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What if I get an allergy?
• Problem: Metal Allergy • Cause: Inferior Jewelry used (contains too much nickel or other irritating alloy) • Indications: Tissue appears to “retreat” from the offending metal. Patient may present with complaints of itching, burning and/or tenderness. S/he may feel virtually no discomfort, even though the piercing seems highly inflamed (asymptomatic). In addition to localized dermatitis, the opening to the piercing may appear significantly larger than the size of the jewelry. Redness where the jewelry rests on the surface of the skin. Granulation tissue will be visible. • Solution/Treatment: Change to an appropriate biocompatible jewelry such as Titanium; or a dense, low-porosity plastic such as Tygon or PTFE. • Problem: Product Sensitivity • Cause: Aftercare products are inappropriate, or the piercee has a product allergy or sensitivity. • Indications: Delayed healing, localized irritation. Tissue surrounding (up to several inches away) the piercing is red, seeping, or contact dermatitis is present. Expansion of the piercing channel. • Treatment: Discontinue current care regimen in favor of milder products and/or less care. Compounded problems: Any one of the above problems can make additional or secondary problems more likely; i.e. an allergic reaction to an inappropriate metal can make a piercee more vulnerable to infection or a reaction to cleaning products. One should be aware when trying to evaluate a troubled piercing, that multiple causes may be affecting it. In addition, overall health and stress level can be crucial to the healing process and should be evaluated and treated as a potential cause for complications with a healing piercing.

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What if I need to remove or change my body jewelry?
There are three basic styles of body jewelry and many variations on those styles. The three styles are a bead ring, captive bead, and circular barbell/barbell. There is never any need to cut body jewelry for removal. Even momentary removal of jewelry from a healing piercing can result in amazingly rapid closure of the piercing, and make reinsertion difficult or impossible. Removal of jewelry in the presence of an infection may result in an abscess. In the event there is a localized, draining infection,quality jewelry should be left in place to allow for passage of matter to the surface. On a bead ring,the bead is attached to one side of the ring. To open the ring for removal, simply twist the ring open. Grasp the ring on each side of the bead, pull gently and one end will pop out of the bead. By pushing one end away from you and pulling the other end toward you to open the ring like a spiral. On a captive bead ring, the bead is held in by the tension of the ring. Grasp the ring with one hand as close to the bead as you can and with the other hand grasp the bead. Gently pull the ring and bead in opposite directions and the bead should snap out of the ring. Twist the ring a little (as in opening a bead ring) and rotate the jewelry to remove the ring. Barbells and circular barbells have threaded ends which can be unscrewed. Like most threaded objects, they tighten to the right and loosen to the left (righty tighty/lefty lucy). On this type of jewelry one or both of the ends will come unscrewed. Ring Expanding Pliers or External Snap Ring Pliers can be used to spread a ring open enough to pop a bead in or out. Place the head of the pliers inside of the ring and gently squeeze on the handle to spread the jaws outward,opening the ring just enough to pop the ball out.

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Privacy-How private is my data?
All user data is strictly confidential. However, in this day and age of internet marketing, we must make you aware, we use google analytics to track your data. Again, we do not sale, share, or give away your data. This is strictly for internal review to see where in the world our traffic is coming from, and how we can improve to make our site more visible.

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Do you have a blog?
We do! We recently started up a blog, and you may access it at bodybyinnoxia.blogspot.com. Suggestions and topics are welcome!

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Last Updated: 9 Jan 2017 18:30:45 PST home  |  about  |  terms  |  contact
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